The ol' 'Quick & Dirty' method - Image provided by Max Pixel

MDT Performance Boost Part 2

I need all the help I can get in terms of speeding up the build & capture process so in addition to the steps mentioned in my previous post, I use this “one weird trick” (smh) to help speed up the actual WIM capturing or generation process.

Speedup Process Overview

  • Copy the base install.wim of your B&C OS to your capture location
  • Rename the .WIM to something meaningful like 1809_install.wim
  • Use that same name for the WIM file name for the capture
  • During B&C your image will be added to the existing WIM
  • Split the captured image into it’s own .WIM
  • Delete the index

Baseline Testing (Optional)

This isn’t required but it’s the only way to validate that the speedup procedure actually works.   In order to do that, you’re just going to start by performing a regular Build & Capture using the normal process to see how long the actual .WIM capture process takes.  This will be our baseline number.  In my test lab, after running several B&C’s I’m finding the capture process takes anywhere from 35 to 40 minutes in my lab.

MDTSpeedup2-001

Apply the Speedup Procedure

To keep things simple, let’s say we’re working on capturing an 1809 image.

Copy the stock 1809 install.wim to your Captures directory and rename it to something meaningful like 1809_install.wim.

Check the details of the WIM you just copied:

dism /get-wininfo /image:"\\MDTServer\DeploymentShare$\Captures\1809_install.wim"

Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool
Version: 10.0.14393.0

Details for image : \\MDTServer\DeploymentShare$\Captures\1809_install.wim

Index : 1
Name : Windows 10 Education
Description : Windows 10 Education
Size : 14,356,142,049 bytes

Index : 2
Name : Windows 10 Education N
Description : Windows 10 Education N
Size : 13,548,111,095 bytes

Index : 3
Name : Windows 10 Enterprise
Description : Windows 10 Enterprise
Size : 14,356,212,795 bytes

Index : 4
Name : Windows 10 Enterprise N
Description : Windows 10 Enterprise N
Size : 13,548,004,622 bytes

Index : 5
Name : Windows 10 Pro
Description : Windows 10 Pro
Size : 14,356,028,734 bytes

Index : 6
Name : Windows 10 Pro N
Description : Windows 10 Pro N
Size : 13,547,960,587 bytes

Index : 7
Name : Windows 10 Pro Education
Description : Windows 10 Pro Education
Size : 14,356,071,811 bytes

Index : 8
Name : Windows 10 Pro Education N
Description : Windows 10 Pro Education N
Size : 13,548,039,957 bytes

Index : 9
Name : Windows 10 Pro for Workstations
Description : Windows 10 Pro for Workstations
Size : 14,356,106,696 bytes

Index : 10
Name : Windows 10 Pro N for Workstations
Description : Windows 10 Pro N for Workstations
Size : 13,548,075,292 bytes

Index : 11
Name : Windows 10 Enterprise for Virtual Desktops
Description : Windows 10 Enterprise for Virtual Desktops
Size : 14,356,177,402 bytes

The operation completed successfully.

Now perform a B&C to get the updated timing details. In my lab, I’m seeing it take about 9 minutes*.

MDTSpeedup2-002

Once the .WIM is created, verify the new index was created:


dism /get-wininfo /image:"\\MDTServer\DeploymentShare$\Captures\1809_install.wim"

Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool
Version: 10.0.14393.0

Details for image : \\MDTServer\DeploymentShare$\Captures\1809_install.wim

Index : 1
Name : Windows 10 Education
Description : Windows 10 Education
Size : 14,356,142,049 bytes

Index : 2
Name : Windows 10 Education N
Description : Windows 10 Education N
Size : 13,548,111,095 bytes

Index : 3
Name : Windows 10 Enterprise
Description : Windows 10 Enterprise
Size : 14,356,212,795 bytes

Index : 4
Name : Windows 10 Enterprise N
Description : Windows 10 Enterprise N
Size : 13,548,004,622 bytes

Index : 5
Name : Windows 10 Pro
Description : Windows 10 Pro
Size : 14,356,028,734 bytes

Index : 6
Name : Windows 10 Pro N
Description : Windows 10 Pro N
Size : 13,547,960,587 bytes

Index : 7
Name : Windows 10 Pro Education
Description : Windows 10 Pro Education
Size : 14,356,071,811 bytes

Index : 8
Name : Windows 10 Pro Education N
Description : Windows 10 Pro Education N
Size : 13,548,039,957 bytes

Index : 9
Name : Windows 10 Pro for Workstations
Description : Windows 10 Pro for Workstations
Size : 14,356,106,696 bytes

Index : 10
Name : Windows 10 Pro N for Workstations
Description : Windows 10 Pro N for Workstations
Size : 13,548,075,292 bytes

Index : 11
Name : Windows 10 Enterprise for Virtual Desktops
Description : Windows 10 Enterprise for Virtual Desktops
Size : 14,356,177,402 bytes

Index : 12
Name : W10_1809_Entx64
Description : 
Size : 24,935,992,683 bytes

The operation completed successfully.

Success!

 

*So, What’s the Catch?

Alright – so maybe I cut a corner or two.

I’ll admit, it might not be helpful to have one giant .WIM with 12+ indexes, so you’d probably want to export that newly created index to it’s own .WIM:

dism /export-image /sourceimagefile:\\MDTServer\DeploymentShare$\Captures\1803_install.wim /sourceindex:12 /destinationimagefile:\\MDTServer\DeploymentShare$\Captures\1803_bnc.wim

I find this process takes about 90 seconds putting us at about 10m30s.

And if you’re doing that you might also want to delete the new index you created in the original install.wim:

dism /delete-image /imagefile:\\MDTServer\DeploymentShare$\Captures\1803_install.wim /index:12

This process takes about 2 seconds putting us at about 10m32s.

On the surface, capturing or generating a WIM in 8-10 minutes sounds like some appreciable gains but this is where the corner cutting begins.

Like a fine wine, I find this process gets [somewhat] better with age:

  • Without any funny business my first capture typically takes anywhere from 35 to 40 minutes.
  • When I use this technique I might shave 5-10 minutes off my first capture depending on what’s in there.  It’s something but not significant.
  • However, when I do my second (third, fourth etc.) capture with this technique – like when I’m doing another B&C to include this/last month’s patches and/or updated software etc. – that’s when I begin to appreciate the speed difference and now the actual WIM capture/generation process takes ~8 to ~11 minutes.

After the first big capture – thick image with everything in it – that usually becomes it’s own .WIM and the differential .WIMs are appended to it.  From here we can either export those differential indexes into their own .WIMs or we leave them in the ‘master’ .WIM which allows for easy regression to a previous ‘version’ by just using a lower number index in the Task Sequence.

In Conclusion

I don’t think this is ground breaking and there are some caveats – specifically being that you have go through one capture before you can truly realize the benefits – but like I said, I need all the help I can get so every little bit counts!

So hopefully this “one weird trick” helps you 🙂

Good Providence!

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